Animal Control reports no animals euthanized for space in past year



There are plenty of fur babies up for adoption at the ACAC facility. Pictured, from left, are ACAC Technician Craig Tallant, Technical Supervisor Sabrina Steenbeke, Chief Henry Dominguez and Technician Joni Canavacholo. REBECCA PESQUEDA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS

There are plenty of fur babies up for adoption at the ACAC facility. Pictured, from left, are ACAC Technician Craig Tallant, Technical Supervisor Sabrina Steenbeke, Chief Henry Dominguez and Technician Joni Canavacholo. REBECCA PESQUEDA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS

For the first time since they opened in October 2018, the Atascosa County Animal Control facility has not euthanized any dogs or cats for spacing purposes for an entire year.

“We are grateful to our partnering rescue groups who take our animals up north when our kennels got full,” said Chief Henry Dominguez. “Since April of last year, we have not euthanized any animals to make additional space in our kennels.”

However, ACAC is not a “no kill” animal facility. This means that, if necessary, they have the authority to euthanize animals for a variety of purposes in addition to needed space including animals who are classified as vicious or unhealthy and animals who were born in the facility but failed to thrive.

In 2020, 300 animals were euthanized for being vicious and 352 were euthanized due to health issues. Only 15 animals born in the ACAC facility were euthanized due to their failure to thrive.

“My staff is highly trained to humanely euthanize animals. If they feel a dog poses a threat to anybody, we will humanely euthanize them for the safety of the public. If they are too sick or too injured to cure, they will also be humanely euthanized so that they do not have to suffer,” said Chief Dominguez.

In addition, ACAC processed a total of 2,030 animals in 2020. Of those, 377 were adopted out, 696 were rescued/transferred by partnering rescue groups and 248 animals were returned to their owners.

“It’s very important that you microchip your animals in case they get lost and end up at our facility,” said Chief Dominguez. “We can scan them for a microchip and, if they have one, we can safely return them to their rightful owners.”

Any animal who ends up at the ACAC facility are scanned for a microchip. If they do not have one, they are held for three days, giving owners a chance to reclaim them. All lost animals who end up at the ACAC facility are immediately posted on their Facebook page. After the three days are up and if animals are not reclaimed, they are put up for adoption unless otherwise contacted by the owners.

The Atascosa County Animal Control facility is located at 292 Spur 162 in Jourdanton, behind the Tex Best. You can also give them a call at 830- 769-2341 or follow their Facebook page.

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