A safe place: Alcohol, substance abuse recovery at Methodist Hospital | South



Methodist Hospital | South provides a safe place for adults who decide to take a 180-degree turn away from alcohol and drugs toward a better life through their new, medical service known as the One-Eighty Program. All patients are admitted to the hospital for a three to five day stay depending on their withdrawal symptyoms and are treated with the same highest quality of care offered to all other hospital patients. METHODIST HOSPITAL | SOUTH | COURTESY PHOTO

Methodist Hospital | South provides a safe place for adults who decide to take a 180-degree turn away from alcohol and drugs toward a better life through their new, medical service known as the One-Eighty Program. All patients are admitted to the hospital for a three to five day stay depending on their withdrawal symptyoms and are treated with the same highest quality of care offered to all other hospital patients. METHODIST HOSPITAL | SOUTH | COURTESY PHOTO

In 2019, Methodist Hospital South conducted a Community Health Needs Assessment in Atascosa County commissioned by The Health Collaborative. At that time, it was found that 14.2% of adults reported heavy alcohol use in the last month versus 6.9% in Bexar County. Other statistics include an estimated 6,800 people per 100,000 adults in Atascosa County misusing psychotherapeutic drugs (pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, sedatives). The opioid prescription rate in the county is also thought to be higher due to a larger older popula- tion with a greater need for pain management. It is apparent that the need for alcohol and substance abuse recovery in Atascosa County is needed and that’s why it’s important to know about the One-Eighty Program offered right here in the county’s very own hospital.

Methodist Hospital | South in Jourdanton partners with Impact Healthcare Management to bring patients the One-Eighty Program, a new medical service tied directly to meeting this pervasive unmet community health need.

The staff behind the program include, from left, William Dylla, VP Clinical Operations; David Long, Director of Emergency Services; DeAnn McKinney, One-Eighty Service Coordinator; and Pamela Guillory, Chief Nursing/Chief Operating Officer. REBECCA PESQUEDA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS

The staff behind the program include, from left, William Dylla, VP Clinical Operations; David Long, Director of Emergency Services; DeAnn McKinney, One-Eighty Service Coordinator; and Pamela Guillory, Chief Nursing/Chief Operating Officer. REBECCA PESQUEDA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS

One-Eighty is a hospitalbased, inpatient medical service for voluntary patients who have decided to take a 180-degree turn away from alcohol and drugs toward a better life. This medical service is designed to help individuals manage the acute symptoms of withdrawal from alcohol and drugs in the safe environment of a hospital with 24/7 medical supervision. One-Eighty is only for adults who are in the beginning stages of withdrawal who do not need emergency care.

If you are unsure of your particular situation, you can call One-Eighty Service Coordinator DeAnn McKinney at 830-769-4567 and she will be happy to answer any of your questions in a safe and confindential manner. You will undergo an assessment to confirm if you are in the beginning stages of withdrawal which will determine if you are accepted into the program or not.

“If they are not displaying any symptoms, then there is no medical necessity for them to be in the program,” said McKinney. “This is a hospital, so it’s not like a regular detox facility with locked doors where patients are withdrawing at various stages from various drugs. [Patients] will have their own hospital room, which is different, so that’s why a lot of them like to come here so they can stabilize during withdrawal. It’s a hospital; they can have visitors. There aren’t any restrictions on them at all, and they’re under a doctor’s care like any other patient.”

 

 

McKinney further explained that if a patient experiencing withdrawal has any underlying health conditions like high blood pressure or diabetes, the One-Eighty program is good for them as they are being monitored by a doctor at all times.

On the hospital side of things, patients in the program can expect your typical medical care by hospital staff.

“Once they are enrolled, DeAnn will take them to registration where they will be registered as an inpatient in our hospital,” said Pamela Guillory, Chief Nursing/Chief Operating Officer for Methodist Hospital | South. “From there, they will be walked to their room by either DeAnn or a charge nurse and admitted to the hospital like any other patient. They will undergo a medical assessment and be told what to expect regarding their plan of care during their stay with us.”

Guillory further explained that patients typically stay in the hospital anywhere from three to five days depending on their symptoms and the type of substance from which they are withdrawing.

“A big concern is that some people don’t want to come here for fear that they are going to see someone they know. We treat them with the same privacy as any other patient,” said Guillory. “We do not put any special markers on their rooms to indicate they are withdrawing from alcohol or drugs. We don’t treat them any differently and our staff provide compassionate care. We give them the same highest quality care that we do everyone else.”

Prior to discharge, patients are set up with an outpatient regimen. Once a patient is discharged from the hospital, DeAnn will check in with them 24 hours later. She will also follow up with patients for an entire year to ensure they are getting the medical care they need and to make sure they aren’t relapsing.

“There is a huge need in our community for the One-Eighty Program and we want everyone to know that Methodist Hospital | South is here to help them,” said Guillory.

If you or someone you know is ready to take a 180-degree turn away from alcohol or drugs, please call DeAnn at the One-Eighty Program in Jourdanton at 830-769- 4567.

Ask the Expert: How do you start a conversation about addiction?

Communicating effectively about addiction could be a difficult task, especially when a loved one is involved. You might be unsure of how to approach your friend or family member and you might be afraid of hurting their feelings or upsetting them.

As an identified support system, you want to educate yourself about their addiction before expressing your concerns in a calming and understanding manner. This could be done at a time when they are not intoxicated or under the influence and willing to share their feelings about their addiction. Identifying their willingness to change their substance abuse behavior will guide the conversation towards options for recovery.

While considering their input, you could present them with materials about their addiction and discuss attainable and measurable goals towards their path to recovery. This could include reviewing a variety of treatment options in their area. One-Eighty at Methodist Hospital | South, for example, is designed to help individuals manage acute symptoms of withdrawal from alcohol and drugs in a safe hospital environment with 24/7 medical supervision.

– DeAnn McKinney, One-Eighty Service Coordinator Methodist Hospital | South

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